Friday, April 25, 2008

No blessing for St. Moyers

West Virginia's Charleston Daily Mail editorial writer and columnist Don Surber posts St. Moyers which begins - - -

After 30 years of railing for separation of church and state, Bill Moyers comes to the aid of the Rev. Jeremiah Wright.

Wright’s attempt to blame others for his anti-American, racist and hateful words — and I defend his right to spew them — has him hitting the friendly media circuit, beginning with Bill Moyers on PBS.

I saw a clip on Fox News. It is softball. It is meant to protect Democratic Sen. Barack Obama.

“He’s a politician, I’m a pastor. We speak to two different audiences. And he says what he has to say as a politician. I say what I have to say as a pastor. But they’re two different worlds,” Wright said.

So why did Wright — 5 days after 9/11 — go into a litany of American political decisions over the years — from Hiroshima forward — to say we earned it?

That’s political speech. He can do it, of course. But he cannot say he’s non-political in his church.

Moyers treats conservative pastors more skeptically. In March, he played T-ball with Mickey Edwards. There was this exchange:

BILL MOYERS: Now, Mickey, take what John Hagee said — take him as serious man — take John McCain standing there, welcoming his endorsement, take what you said about conservatives owing their inspiration to the constitution with a limited government and personal liberties—

MICKEY EDWARDS: Right.

BILL MOYERS: Where that, listening to that, does John McCain’s stand in the evolution or in the reclaiming of conservatism, which is your mission in life?

Wait, I thought there was a separation of church and state. Why does Moyers want McCain grilled on matters of theology?

Then there was this: “But what about the emergence of the religious right? Each of us seem to be saying that the religious zeal of fanatical believers, allied to an aggressive, military state, has been a recipe for disaster. But that’s what you’re getting with the Bush-Cheney policy and the third term of the Bush-Cheney policy incarnated in John McCain.”

Small wonder when shoping for a sympathetic interviewer, Wright settled on Moyers….

Surber’s entire post’s here.

Comments:

Read the rest of Surber’s post. He has a lot more to say about St. Moyers.

I think many of you will wind up saying, “Holy Hypocrisy!”

As for Rev. Jeremiah Wright, he'll do fine with Moyers as long as he doesn't condemn "gay America" or shout "God damn PBS!"

As for "white America" and "God damn America," they're no problem. Moyers "understands" those sentiments.

Hat tip: Instapundit.com

3 comments:

Archer05 said...

John, I would appreciate your thoughts on John McCain trying to force the NC GOP to pull their governor’s race, Rev. Wright/Obama ad. Today a commentator chided him for being a speech cop.

I do not agree that the add is racial. It simply shows Rev. Wright in one of his bombastic sermons. The guilt by association importance is left up to the voters.

Anonymous said...

Moyers' credibility outside of very limited leftist circles is nil. He is a doctrinaire, classic Leninist and would have been a good Stalinist had be lived under his favorite social system. Does it surprise anyone that he is the first to offer cover for Pastor Wright? And did you notice how mild-mannered and reasonable Wright appeared? None of the wild-eyed, raspy racist shreiks we have all come to know from his "sermons." If Blacks want to be included in our society, how is it they always demand to be judged by other standards? Now it's "Afican-American Theology!" Sheeesh. I'm over it.
Tarheel Hawkeye

RedMountain said...

Nice of McCain to take the high road on this one. Just goes to show how much the real conservative base of the Republican party is happy with their own nominee. Frankly, this base both from the political and media standpoint are more concerned with helping the Clinton machine steal the nomination than listening to the man that will lead them. They feel much more comfortable going against Hillary in the fall and I can't blame them for that. They know if Clinton manages an end-around and walks away with the nomination, she will sacrifice much of her support to do so.

McCain showed a profound look of puzzlement when asked why they didn't do what he asked. Too funny.